Author Topic: Standard dome Models  (Read 13018 times)

Offline RE

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Split Level Dome Design
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2014, 02:46:02 AM »
I worked on a new idea to use a Split Level arrangement with smaller domes in order to achieve the Headroom on the second level to meet code.  The design also incorporates more Square Angles to accept standard prefab bathroom and kitchen hardware.


This design is working with an approximately 24-28' diameter Dome.  In order to gain the extra headroom in the center, you do a 2-3' excavation before you pour the footing.  Then you have 3-5 steps down to the Kitchen area, and 3-5 steps up to the Sleeping area.  This should be negotiable even for elderly people, and if you took a fall, you would not fall very far. The upper 2/3rds in the diagram show the upstairs layout, the bottom one shows the downstairs and grade level.  No Techy Lofts that go up and down in this design, real rooms.

Advantages here is that your Kitchen has additional thermal mass to hold the heat from your wood stove, and you don't need near so much extra concrete as with building a 2-3'  outer wall to raise up the whole dome.

Obviously I need to get a better design program, Paint is not very good for this but you should get the idea.  I'll hunt up a design program.  Recommendations welcome on that.

Update: Split Level Design II



RE
« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 03:40:58 AM by RE »

Offline RE

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Semi-Communal Dome Design
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2014, 04:48:38 AM »
OK, another idea.

Since these Units are designed basically for Singles or at most a Couple, it is a WASTE to have a separate bathroom and kitchen and all the hardware for each of them, not to mention all the lost space with walls and so forth.

So here is an idea for Semi-Communal living that still gives each individual their Private Space.


The Central Area has a shared Kitchen and Bathroom Facility, both much larger than in the Individual Layout.  Outside this central area though, they still have divided Apartments with additional living area and sleeping lofts.  In this arrangement, you could have other separate Rooms like an Office etc.

If it is a facility for the Elderly, this would allow one Assistant to drop in and help in kitchen and bathroom cleanup and also allow these folks to interact with each other and not be Isolated.

This arrangement would give a LOT more living space inside the same size dome by removing the redundancy of so many Bathrooms and Kitchen areas.  3 People just don't need that, it is a waste of space, not to mention expensive hardware.

You would match up people by Interviews and so forth, to find compatible people for each Dome.  The Bonus they get for choosing this style of living is much more Space because the redundant kitchens and bathrooms have been eliminated.  You could go with one Large Refrigerator with separate shelves for each person instead of 3 tiny refrigerators.  One nice 6 burner stove instead of tiny 3 or 3 burner units.  Etc.

There could be separate Cabinets in the Kitchen for each person to store their food and utensils.

Feedback on this idea solicited also.

RE

Offline RE

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Ecoshell Greenhouse/Garage Combo Unit
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2014, 05:41:01 AM »

For safe car storage and Food Production.  No insulation, basic ecoshell.

RE

Offline jdwheeler42

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Re: Semi-Communal Dome Design
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2014, 08:35:27 AM »
You would match up people by Interviews and so forth, to find compatible people for each Dome.  The Bonus they get for choosing this style of living is much more Space because the redundant kitchens and bathrooms have been eliminated.  You could go with one Large Refrigerator with separate shelves for each person instead of 3 tiny refrigerators.  One nice 6 burner stove instead of tiny 3 or 3 burner units.  Etc.
I would be very careful about being too "efficient".  Bathing can certainly be scheduled so there is no need for redundancy there, but two toilets would not be wasted.  And I would make sure the bathing facilities and toilet facilities could be used separately.

Also, don't be too sure about the single fridge idea.  The biggest use of energy in a fridge is all the cold air that escapes when you open the door.  3 small fridges whose doors get opened 1/3 as often can use much less energy than a big fridge.

With those caveats, I definitely like the idea.

Offline H

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Re: Semi-Communal Dome Design
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2014, 11:35:02 AM »
OK, another idea.

Since these Units are designed basically for Singles or at most a Couple, it is a WASTE to have a separate bathroom and kitchen and all the hardware for each of them, not to mention all the lost space with walls and so forth.

For a community facility, great.  For rental units, each individual needs to be self-contained, particularly if the rent is being paid by the taxpayer.  I'm all for community living, but when it's a paying customer, the unit must meet IRC2009 codes for habitation. 


Quote
You would match up people by Interviews and so forth, to find compatible people for each Dome.  The Bonus they get for choosing this style of living is much more Space because the redundant kitchens and bathrooms have been eliminated.  You could go with one Large Refrigerator with separate shelves for each person instead of 3 tiny refrigerators.  One nice 6 burner stove instead of tiny 3 or 3 burner units.  Etc.

I have a application developer costing out the design of a "eharmony meets a doomer forum" software package, as I discussed at the convocation. 

Bunk space and communal living area for 18 people would be around 6k per "seat" for construction,  land and local red tape (permitting) on top of that.  Keeping those costs - and barriers to getting it done - is why I'm absorbing the IRC2009 codes.

25k gets you a private one-bed apartment in the community, 42k gets you a half-dome of around 750 square feet,  whereas 80k will get you your own 1,500 square feet doomer mansion.  That's very basic fixtures and fittings, which can be upgraded.


Offline H

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Re: two-bed, plus 1-bed, plus studio
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2014, 11:57:15 AM »


This is the preliminary design on which  I'm planning to have the first feasibility study done.  Before then, I'm reviewing every aspect for IRC compliance.  Ignore the "below ground" part of the circle, I've not got to image clean-up yet.

It is probably close to the first one we'll do for ourselves, the two/one/studio having the most options for living space for those most likely to relocate first. 


Offline RE

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Re: Semi-Communal Dome Design
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2014, 05:36:44 PM »

I would be very careful about being too "efficient".  Bathing can certainly be scheduled so there is no need for redundancy there, but two toilets would not be wasted.  And I would make sure the bathing facilities and toilet facilities could be used separately.

Also, don't be too sure about the single fridge idea.  The biggest use of energy in a fridge is all the cold air that escapes when you open the door.  3 small fridges whose doors get opened 1/3 as often can use much less energy than a big fridge.

With those caveats, I definitely like the idea.

Definitely you should have more than one toilet in privacy enclosures, and the shower area separate.  I'll need to get a real Home Design CAD program with all the fixtures the right size and so forth to do a good job on the layout.

I don't see why it wouldn't pass muster on Code, long as you have enough toilets for the maximum # of residents, in this case 6 at 2 per unit.  If the smaller individual refrigerators are more efficient, you simply put 3 of them in the kitchen instead of one large one. 

It's definitely the way to go for an Assisted Living facility.  Probably would work well for those Autistic Homes WHD takes care of.

By shrinking the Dome to 26' with 3 units instead of 4, how does this affect the cost per unit?  I'm too lazy to take out the MDI spreadsheet.  ::)

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Offline luciddreams

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Re: Standard dome Models
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2014, 10:04:46 PM »
That all looks real good H.  I don't have anything to add or any critiques thus far. 

It all seems viable and likely to occur.  Much more so now than it did while we were doing the training.  I was having a hard time seeing the big picture I think. 

I hope to live in one of these domes in this life...not just the next one.  I'm also curious about what my involvement will look like at the point you find an investor and the funds to actually start building somewhere.  When are you going to have a top level position in the corporation that will be building these things that needs filling?   ::)






Offline monsta666

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Re: Semi-Communal Dome Design
« Reply #23 on: April 24, 2014, 06:00:21 AM »

I think a communal area in the centre is a good idea and could work even with a small family. The parents can take the space behind the bathroom so it becomes the master bedroom with an en-suite bathroom while the other bedrooms are on the outer sections. People can congregate to the centre when they want or leave relatively easily (and efficiently) if they desired into their individual spaces. Only thing is how well do these domes insulate? Would people get cold staying near the edge of the dome in colder climates?

Offline H

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Re: Standard dome Models
« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2014, 10:08:26 AM »
That all looks real good H.  I don't have anything to add or any critiques thus far. 

It all seems viable and likely to occur.  Much more so now than it did while we were doing the training.  I was having a hard time seeing the big picture I think. 

I hope to live in one of these domes in this life...not just the next one.  I'm also curious about what my involvement will look like at the point you find an investor and the funds to actually start building somewhere.  When are you going to have a top level position in the corporation that will be building these things that needs filling?   ::)

We met we a foam expert on Tuesday, he confirmed most of what we learned and shared a few hints and tips, as well as the pricing they would provide and some real-world data.  A good foaming sprayer can put down 10k - 11k board-feet of foam in a day, the model I'm looking at has 10,700. 

I'm currently studying IRC 2009 and IBC 2009 so we're not limited with our designs to areas with no planning controls.  I've asked WHD to price our internal structure but not heard back from him yet.   We have a price for putting the shell up, just need internal costs and the skills of a general contractor help.

You should find out what the building codes and red tape factor are near your urban land...



Offline Eddie

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Re: Standard dome Models
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2014, 10:50:10 AM »
I had emailed David South about his rental software. Seems he really isn't so interested in letting me look at it until I buy something from them. I am planning to take A. up there in May. I will talk to Anne Sutherland, the rental maven.

Looks like I might head up and couch surf at the aquaponics guy's house this weekend and build a small system under his tutelage. I've taken a break from my projects at the stead.

LD and GM, thanks for leaving everything so shipshape out there.


Offline H

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Re: Standard dome Models
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2014, 12:13:29 PM »
I had emailed David South about his rental software. Seems he really isn't so interested in letting me look at it until I buy something from them. I am planning to take A. up there in May. I will talk to Anne Sutherland, the rental maven.

Looks like I might head up and couch surf at the aquaponics guy's house this weekend and build a small system under his tutelage. I've taken a break from my projects at the stead.

LD and GM, thanks for leaving everything so shipshape out there.

I've emailed David a couple of times and also Mike regarding some website corrections, got no response.  I suspect once I order a feasibility study the attitude will change.




Offline RE

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Re: Semi-Communal Dome Design
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2014, 04:09:53 PM »
I think a communal area in the centre is a good idea and could work even with a small family. The parents can take the space behind the bathroom so it becomes the master bedroom with an en-suite bathroom while the other bedrooms are on the outer sections. People can congregate to the centre when they want or leave relatively easily (and efficiently) if they desired into their individual spaces. Only thing is how well do these domes insulate? Would people get cold staying near the edge of the dome in colder climates?

The Domes with the polyurethane are about the best insulated buildings on the planet.  Together with the large thermal mass of the concrete, they are very cheap to heat and cool.  there isn't much difference between the area near the surface and the center.

I downloaded SketchUp from Google to start working on some real plans rather than the schematics done with Paint.  I'll see if I can figure out the program over the weekend.  You get 8 hours to work with the full version before you lose some of the functions in the freeware.  Google wants $590 for the Pro version, not buying that for a while.

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Offline luciddreams

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Re: Standard dome Models
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2014, 07:04:13 PM »
No worries Eddie, it was our pleasure to leave the stead shipshape.  I left that Mozerella Kilbosa because I could never cook it due to Wendy's dairy allergy. 

Come to find out, it's not dairy, at least she's been eating dairy since the last day at the stead, and no worse outbreak.  So apparently there is no dairy allergy...for now at least. 

Anyways, we left a bunch of stuff strewn about at the stead, including my ring.  Did you find the blue pipe in the hugel bed yet?  It's beneath some bark on the North side of the bed.  Wasn't that piece of wood somethin'.  I can't wait to show the pics of that thing to those reading this now. 

What about that job H?  How much are you going to pay me?  I need like 60 grand a year to live large with a rental with a Pisgah National Forest address.  Just at the bottom of "Cold Mountain."  It's another double wide, similar to the Toothstead, in an area of the world that I learned to backpack in.  We're just going to write a 10 grand check for rent for the year...having no income to show and whatnot.  I figure who's gonna turn down a year's worth of rent? 

Offline H

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Re: Standard dome Models
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2014, 07:33:10 PM »
It's going to be a while before a dome-building company is up and running, maybe six months to a year at the least.  Learning the building regs, writing the business plan, the feasibility study and plans drawn up, and getting our own dome built so we can show what we can do - all take time, and I still have to work full time. 

At least paying a years rent in advance means you are committed to the area you seem to like. We're not sure where we will relocate to yet, but now we know the challenges in getting the 'stead we want, we're working toward it with greater vigor.

Still planning on a trip out to California in the summer?